In The News

What’s Happening at Those Museums You Never Visit

Houston PressPosted August 14, 2018 in In The News

Houston Center for Contemporary Craft
B. Anele: I Dont’ Play That Game – Ongoing until 10/7/2018

Unlike other galleries, studios, and museums that display mostly photography and paintings, the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft has a more narrowly defined focus. Art made with crafting materials. You may call them sculptures but many of the works of art displayed at the HCCC transcend sculpting and defy definition. Take for instance the ongoing exhibition, I don’t play that game by Houston based artist, B. Anele.

Anele presents a collection of wildly unique works of art that incorporate raw canvas garments into soft sculptures. The pieces are highly exaggerated, even architectural, yet functional as garments and displayed on models. The artist creates provocative art that challenges its audience, fusing the real and the surreal to join fashion with environment.

I Don’t Play That Game will by on display at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft until October 7, 2018.

B. Anele Engineers a Collision of Color and Counterculture

Houstonia MagazinePosted August 10, 2018 in In The News

The transdisciplinary artist skewers traditional symbols and images in a new Houston Center for Contemporary Craft exhibition.

By Anna Lassmann

LARGE PIECES OF JAGGED CANVAS, painted with an assortment of primary colors depicting a person with bright purple hair, a red polka dot nose, and a pink turtleneck, engulfed in iconography of hairspray, smiley faces, and words such as “commotion,” make up the eight-foot-wide piece titled Electric Shock by Houston transdisciplinary artist B. Anele.

“I believe the world needs more color,” Anele says. “There is so much gray and brown everywhere, and colors seen to be reserved for children, which I think says a lot about society’s projections on growing up—meaning you have to lose some sense of wonder, excitement, and self-expression.”

Electric Shock is one piece from Anele’s most recent body of work currently on display at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. The exhibit, “I Don’t Play That Game,” features about a dozen pieces mostly composed from canvas and paint, resembling extravagant fashion pieces. Another piece is a ten-foot-tall gray jumpsuit with road stripes dividing the legs titled The Road to What.

“There is kind of a theme of the road, which is such an American trope, like road trips,” says Sarah Darro, curatorial fellow at HCCC. “A lot of their work alludes to roadside attractions and the counterculture you can experience while pulling off to a random roadside attraction.”

“It’s communicating to the viewer that they want you to take a trip,” Darro adds. Continue Reading »

5 Things You Must Do This Weekend, June 1–3

Houstonia MagazinePosted May 31, 2018 in In The News

Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in America

June 2–Sept. 2 | Houston Center for Contemporary Craft

Long after “underwater basket weaving” became the go-to stand-in for a frivolous or indulgent activity, the National Basketry Organization (a real thing!) teams up with the University of Missouri to reclaim the basket narrative at HCCC. The five-part exhibition examines the timeless medium that elegantly straddles the divide between function and form. Free. Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, 4848 Main St. 713-529-4848. More info at crafthouston.org.

Arts InSight: “Light Charmer”

Houston Public MediaPosted May 4, 2018 in In The News, Videos

At the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Arts InSight host Ernie Manouse talks with curator Kathryn Hall about the exhibition “Light Charmer,” which features works in neon and plasma. Original air date: May 4, 2018.

Glasstire Top Five: March 1, 2018 with Kaneem Smith

GlasstirePosted March 3, 2018 in In The News, Videos

Brandon Zech and guest host Kaneem Smith on a clever “relocation” of the Menil Collection, a stack of black cats, and the inarguable pleasure of neon.

Houston museum takes a craft perspective on Surrealism, focuses on work by Michael Crowder

Glass QuarterlyPosted March 1, 2018 in In The News

The above image is not a pipe. It is a representation of a pipe created from cigarette ashes and resin by artist Michael Crowder, inspired by René Magritte’s iconic painting The Treachery of Images (1928-1929)This pipe is one of several of Crowder’s works currently on display in the exhibition Treachery of Material: The Surrealist Impulse in Craft at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft (HCCC). The exhibition presents a series of “puzzling and beautiful” objects made by Houston-based Michael Crowder and Estonia-based artist Julia Maria Künnap.

On the surface, Crowder and Künnap’s works are composed of seemingly opposed materials: Crowder employs delicate glass and decomposable materials like ash and soap, while Künnap uses apparently more stable and solid gemstones and metals. The combination is intended to evoke reflection on the endurance of surrealist visual strategies among contemporary artists. As curator Sarah Darro explained, “I am not seeking to label the artists or the works in this show ‘Surrealist,’ but I am using Surrealism as a lens with which to understand the visual strategies and processes of these contemporary artists.” Through this lens, we readily see that both artists reference famous surrealist figures or motifs in their work. However, this lens also focuses on the continuing use of materials and techniques in unexpected and thought-provoking ways, a thread that connects contemporary artists like Crowder and Künnap with surrealist artists from the 1920s-1960s. Continue Reading »

Art Daybook: ‘Magic Garden’ by Mundy Hepburn

Houston ChroniclePosted February 28, 2018 in In The News

The piece: “Magic Garden”

The artist: Mundy Hepburn

Where: In the show “Light Charmer: Neon and Plasma in Action,” through May 13 at Houston Center for Contemporary Craft

Why:The artworks of this exhibition all entice viewers with a colorful glow and some kind of kinetic charge. A few gain their sense of movement from sections of neon lights that blink on and off. One combines light, sound, electricity and toys. Another is designed to be pulled like a toy dog on a leash. And there’s a set of true “light sabers” that were brandished by their creators for an opening-night performance. Continue Reading »

Houston museum takes a craft perspective on Surrealism, focuses on work by Michael Crowder

Glass QuarterlyPosted February 28, 2018 in In The News

The above image is not a pipe. It is a representation of a pipe created from cigarette ashes and resin by artist Michael Crowder, inspired by René Magritte’s iconic painting The Treachery of Images (1928-1929)This pipe is one of several of Crowder’s works currently on display in the exhibition Treachery of Material: The Surrealist Impulse in Craft at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft (HCCC). The exhibition presents a series of “puzzling and beautiful” objects made by Houston-based Michael Crowder and Estonia-based artist Julia Maria Künnap.

On the surface, Crowder and Künnap’s works are composed of seemingly opposed materials: Crowder employs delicate glass and decomposable materials like ash and soap, while Künnap uses apparently more stable and solid gemstones and metals. The combination is intended to evoke reflection on the endurance of surrealist visual strategies among contemporary artists. As curator Sarah Darro explained, “I am not seeking to label the artists or the works in this show ‘Surrealist,’ but I am using Surrealism as a lens with which to understand the visual strategies and processes of these contemporary artists.” Through this lens, we readily see that both artists reference famous surrealist figures or motifs in their work. However, this lens also focuses on the continuing use of materials and techniques in unexpected and thought-provoking ways, a thread that connects contemporary artists like Crowder and Künnap with surrealist artists from the 1920s-1960s.  Continue Reading »

Art Beat – CraftHouston Spring 2018

HCC Stafford TVPosted February 26, 2018 in In The News, Videos

New Neon Exhibition Challenges the Boundaries of a Storied Medium

Free Press HoustonPosted February 9, 2018 in In The News

Light is no stranger to the art world. From old masters like Johannes Vermeer, who captured the purest moments of sunlight on his subjects, to contemporary artists such as James Terrell, who is adept at creating tranquil moments between light and solid form, light has always been a prime focus of art. However, although many artists have captured and interpreted this element through their respective mediums, it wasn’t until the late 1800’s that light was truly captured by Thomas Edison. Since then, working with the wonders of science, creatives and inventors alike have challenged their boundaries to travel beyond industry and science and into their own imaginations. As with any craft and its intended purpose, artists twist and mold light to form new craft and new forms in which to express. Continue Reading »